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by a cambridge electorate. at school, he was actually discouraged from pursuing a career in science. >> it was a completely ridiculous idea because there was no hope whatsoever of my doing science and then a time spent on it would be a total waste on my part and whoever had to teach me. but the nobel jury beg to differ. >> we now knew that -- know that development is not strictly a one-way street. >> there is hope that their work will pave the way for developing methods to diagnose and treat many diseases. >> to find out more about this, we are joined by our science correspondent. a lot of people around the world are working in stem cell research. why did these two get the prize? >> they got it for the same reason a lot of nobel prize laureates have gotten it -- they went against the currents. we used to believe that cell differentiation only went in one direction. you had these undifferentiated cells, stem cells, and then they became something in the course of development. in the embryo has a lot of them and they turn into bone, skin, liver. everyone thought it only went in one dir
science on earth. and this is an odd kind of expedition for another reason. usually scientists go off in different directions, different times using their own tools. for mer the entire team was all together. 150 scientists and engineers balancing together, as it were, like on a huge skateboard creeping over the sand, up the down and hills and craters meters at a time for eight years. so it's something like being on a ship, on an early voyageover discovery. the scientists and the sailing crew were all having to travel together. they had to negotiate how long are we going to stay here in where are we going to go next in and what should we do at each site? and this requires a well coordinated understanding of their roles, schedules, resources, long-term plans and a clear chain of command. if you visited the science and engineering coordination meeting during the prime mission, which was the first 90 days of landing on mars in 2004, same thing we're going through now with curiosity during these 90 days, you could see the scientists up front on the bridge, as it were, with huge displays of
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
. we have the latest lessons in science and history from the gop. stay with us. >> we all like pbs. i mean, i have grand kids, they love big bird and burt ander ni and so forth, but we borrow money effectively from china to make sure our kids don't have to watch advertising on pbs. my view is it makes sense to stop borrowing many and let our kids get used to corn flakes. >> sesame street was brought today by the letter "g" for grouch. the capital one cash rewards card gives you a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more [ russian accent ] rubles. eh, eheh, eh, eh. [ brooklyn accent ] 50% more simoleons. [ western accent ] 50% more sawbucks. ♪ [ maine accent ] 50% more clams. it's a lobster, either way. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card. with a 50% annual cash bonus, it's the card for people who like more cash. [ italian accent ] 50% more dough! what's in your wallet? a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be diffi
. >> if i had to pick someone to win and become a spokesperson for what is best about science and biomedical science it would be him. >> reporter: i asked the doctor how he is going to celebrate. he said he's probably going to have a beer. the love for medicine runs in his family, his wife is a dermatologist and their two doctors are both in medical school. amy hollyfield, abc7 news. >>> much more still ahead. developing news in a meningitis outbreak linked to contaminated medicine, the rise in the number of cases. >>> battle between wedding caught on video. the wild fight that ended with the death of one man. >>> federal health officials say the number of confirmed meningitis cases from contaminated steroid shots has risen to 105, death toll from 7 to 8. the drugs were sent to four clinics here in california. t.j. winick reports the drugs are being recalled. >> reporter: the pharmacy the at the center of the meningitis out brach has announced voluntary recall of every product -- it makes saying this action is being taken out of abundance of caution. one of those sickened was janet russell o
had to pick someone to win and become a spokesperson for what is best about science and biomedical science it would be him. >> reporter: i asked the doctor how he is going to celebrate. he said he's probably going to have a beer. the love for medicine runs in his family, his wife is a dermatologist and their two doctors are both in medical school. amy hollyfield, abc7 news. >>> much more still ahead. developing news in a meningitis outbreak linked to contaminated medicine, the rise in the number of cases. >>> battle between wedding caught on video. the wild fight that ended with the death of one ron: years ago i made a promise to provide the best for my family, in sickness and in health. carol and i needed help figuring out what's covered by medicare and what's not. so we turned to the same folks we've relied on for health insurance all these years. announcer: ron and carol called anthem blue cross and found an affordable medicare plan that pays for some costs original medicare won't. now they can keep making memories for years to come. choose from plans offering protection from hi
think he did it here. let's watch. >> it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. but, look, i think part of that was because, as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's $4.8 trillion or $5 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher plan. i love teachers, i think we need more of them. i mean, look, don't believe me, speaker gingrich was pretty eloquent in running during the primaries in saying, look, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> well, one thing i have been saying about the campaign is the president needs surrogates out there, he needs confederates, people out there. i love charleston. a lot of people -- rather charlotte because in charlotte you heard an entire political party speaking led by people like deval patrick, the governor of massachusetts, after you saw mr. mayor. i think it sounds be
. bush administration. he's now a professor of political science and public policy at duke university. we thank you both for being with us. peter feaver, to you first. we heard governor romney today criticize the president broadly for not rejecting strongly enough america's influence in the world. yet when it came to specifics, we didn't hear many details. so let me just ask you about a couple of different places in the world. what about when it comes to iran. what exactly governor romney be doing differently right now? >> well, this is the criticism that the obama campaign has leveled at the romney campaign for not being detailed and specific enough. when it comes to iran, the president hasn't laid out a red line that he said clearly he would enforce. when asked to be precise about what it means for iran not to possess a nuclear weapon, the articulation of the red line, he's been vague and says he doesn't want to parse it further. i think there's a certain element of ambiguity about where you would draw the line precisely so as to avoid being trapped by it. but the other point to make is
, the ones who had really, you know, profound new ideas on science, had this interesting pattern where they, actually had a lot more kind of failed papers. and they published, they had far more volume to their work, and a huge number of those papers never went anywhere. it was every now and then, there would be one that would be incredible breakout hit and would change science forever, then most of the time they were starting out hitting like baseball a short little ground out whereas the none in -- noninnovative thinkers, who hadn't had disruptive idea, they were just hitting kind of singles and were much more consistent, had higher batting average but weren't swinging for the fences. so the argument is that to really be kind of successful in a new way and open up a new door or possibility in your field or science or some other field you have to have tolerance for failure and error. that is one of the things we see in silicon valley. is that that is if you're an entrepreneur in silicon valley and you haven't had at least one failed startup people look at you strangely. you're supposed to t
oh, we're coming to get you. this dude is on the committee of science and technology. as would say he's from the tech-mology committee. and you know who else is on that committee? todd akin. all these guys from congress, i got t this is a good one. this is when lucifer burned the dinosaur bones. let's put the dumbest guys on the science and technology committee. if you think that's bad we're just warming up. a book with letters to the edit editor. the constitution of slavery to the black race has long believed to be an abomination upon its people. may actually have been a blessing in disguise. the blacks who could endure those conditions and circumstances would some day be rewarded with citizenship in the greatest nation ever established upon the face of the earth. oh, i don't know why i didn't see it that way? it's a blessing in disguise. why don't you be my slave and you do all my work. if you don't i'll whip you. does that sound like a blessing in disguise? and how hot is your wife? i might want to have sex with her. and what about your daughters. should have i sex with them before
treatment. our report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: for the first time ever, an experimental drug is showing great promise of slowing the alzheimer's disease. >> this is the first time we are seeing a slowing of the cognitive decline in patients with alzheimer's disease in this type of drug treatment. >> reporter: at first, the experimental drug seemed to fail as has every experimental drug to date. but when the manufacturer looked at it more closely, it found those with more mild disease had a less memory loss than those with the placebo, the 71-year-old retired expert still functions well. >> there are things that take a lot longer than they used to because i keep forgetting the order in which things have to be done. >> reporter: the results presented today combined studies with a total of 2,000 patients in the last two months. most scientists say it wouldn't be enough to reach the fda approval. but further studies show that it could help people with early alzheimer's disease. the drug is certainly not the cure that everybody wants, but for al krieger
♪] >> and he is the head of the committee on science. >> stephanie: yeah, you sometimes think it's an onion headline. brown respect of georgia. all of the stuff i was taught about evolution, the big bang is theory, all of that is lies straight from the pit of hell and it's lies to try to keep me and all of the folks that were taught right by thinking they need a savior. this is the man in 2007 who said he didn't believe president obama is an american citizen. and i bet he is a job truther as well. >> yeah, they would have quotation marks around science. >> stephanie: yeah. david, good morning. >> caller: i saw something great the other day on randi rhodes one of her things on facebook. hey, mitt today's sesame street is brought to you by the number 7.8. [ laughter ] >> caller: if we're going to massage the numbers, why don't make it 5.5. >> great point. >> caller: thank you. >> stephanie: the number 7.8, brought to you by the letters f u. rude pundit has some great stuff on all of this as we continue on the "stephanie miller show." ♪ p in congress. it won't do anything fo
on thursday. we wish him well. >> all in the name of science. >> time for one last check on the weather. >> there are 70 different restaurants, five city blocks of food and drink. there are a lot of great smells and tastes. it runs all afternoon until 7:00. it will be chilly. there could be a springboard two. there will be covered areas. the next couple days, we will be warming. >> westbound connecticut avenue is shut down because of a i'm barack obama, and i approve this message. "i'm not in favor of a $5 trillion tax cut. that's not my plan." mitchell: "the nonpartisan tax policy center concluded that mitt romney's tax plan would cost $4.8 trillion over 10 years." vo: why won't t romney level with us abt his tax plan which gives the wealthyhuge new tax breaks? because according to experts, he'd have to raise taxes on the middle class - or increase the deficit to pay ior it. if we can't trt t him here... how could we ever trust him here?
to uphold the constitution. >> reporter: rachel caufield is a professor of political science at drake university and a research fellow at the american judicature society. she thinks it's the family leader and other conservative groups around the country, that are inserting money and politics into the judicial system. >> i think we have a movement afoot to politicize our courts and in politicizing our courts i think basically that undermines the quality of justice in america. there's definitely a trend nationwide. we've seen a huge increase in campaign spending among judicial candidates, many of whom are supported by similar interest groups. >> reporter: according to the nonpartisan group called justice at stake, from 2000 to 2009, money spent on state supreme court justice races jumped more than two and a half times to over $206 million. in iowa in 2010, money spent, mostly from out of state totaled over $1.2 million to unelect the three justices there with ads like this -- >> if they can redefine marriage none of the freedoms we hold dear are safe from judicial activism. to hold acti
is, like 80% water, right? that means the world has to be like 90% a&i. that's just science. think it's weird to collect air? you wouldn't think so if you saw what your lungs collect every time you breathe. people can make fun of me all they want, but i choose to see the glass half-full. ofir. protect your health with life-saving air quality updates from the american lung association. get our free "nsate of the air" app at lung.org. >> during last week's presidential debate, republican candidate mitt romney vowed to cut funding to p-b-s --depsite his love for the big yellow bird >> this weekend, sesame street's big bird, joined seth meyers on saturday night live... i got a million tweets... >> on twitter? >> no, i'm a bird, tweeting is how we talk >> big bird declined to comment on romney's statement >> that is the news for this sunday night... instant replay is coming up next... wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switching t
professor are the winners of the nobel prize in science. the prize is $1.2 million that they will share. a quick reminder of our top story, hugo chavez has hailed his presidential electoion win as a continuance of his socialist revolution. stay with us. there's plenty more to come. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
's your move. >> jon: next time on "herman cain, an american presidency," science. >> herman cain ain't no clone. (laughter) >> john oliver=w >> jon: welcome back! my guest tonight, his new movie is called "taken 2." >> where's mom? >> she's fine. she's not far. >>s where she? >> come on, kim, move! >> where are we going? >> we have to go to the embassy. >> i'm not sure i can. >> you know how to shoot? >> no. >> then drive. >>>> that's why you should take the subway. (laughter) please welcome back to the program liam neeson. (cheers and applause) how you been? >> thank you. congratulations. >> jon: thank you. oh, the emmy thing? very kind of you to say. a gentleman in the audience tonight wanted to know why i didn't receive an emmy for my work on "the faculty." (laughter) which is the wrong question on so many different levels. (laughter) that -- that was the kind of thing "taken 2" what type of awards do you think -- are there awards for kicking so much ass in a movie? (laughter) the assies, maybe? >> there's an idea. >> jon: what did they take this time? the last time they took your
could have a profound affect on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the b
on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the beating cells they began watch
, palestinian history and political science professors aleh -- saleh hamayel. >> whenever a colonial settler situation never used the natives as their force, their fate was always genocide. total, physical extermination. now that was not easy to do in the middle of the 20th-century. fortunately for us, the done is to project came in 1948. it was too late to duplicate what happened for the indians of north america. >> your response, dennis banks, to the palestinian political science professor? >> i think -- his presence is very strong. i listened intently to what he was saying. after we had a chance to look at the comparisons of this happening in palestine now as to what happened with us during the 1930's and 1940's. it is the same pattern. i said that on the very first day when this -- what is happening to those people is what we went through during the last century. it is, unfortunately, it is the same people. it is the u.s. government with funneled money to israel and then it goes to hurt the palestinian people. >> dennis banks, thank you for being with us today as we conclude this day of
the bet of the science research we can get on the space station. you have to bring in many cases samples, biological and pharmaceutical and material science experiments, they have to return samples to earth. >>trace: it will dock with the international space station on wednesday, stay there for three weeks and it before splashing de pacific ocean. >>shepard: there have been glitches? >>trace: the rocket which carries the capsule into space, it lost an engine on ascent and they had to rely on the other eight engines to get in orbit. nasa is very precise and will certainly want a full account from spacex about what happened. that could delay their next launch which is scheduled for january. spacex says the rockets are designed to be able to lose an engine and keep going. also, glitches happen. >> we will continue to always improve. we will learn from our flights and continue to improve the vehicle. given that we are looking toward flying crew on the vehicles, we want to make sure we address any and all items that we find and learn about it so we can make it more reliable. >>trace: spacex a
. each polling sort of public polling has their own art and science to likely voting and it is pretty much an art as it is a science a. lot of people had the art wrong going into the late primaries. that's why you saw early polls in the primaries being way off because you're hilikely voter didn't look like a electorate turned out. we had 11% of the general electorate in '08, so the screen was completely off. typically, you're going to undersample minorities and all these polls. that said, a big difference between a registered voter and likely voter, it's someone who says they're likely to vote high on their propensity up front on the phone call say they're going to vote and or they have some past performance in their background where they voted in one of the two or two of the three general elections. there's an art to this. on this point, i don't play the polling game back and forth, but a seven-point swing in party identification i think goes a long way to explain this. i know this is a story that the media wants to drive, but at the same time, you have a political out with a poll th
. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will join us to talk financials, jobs and the election, mr. obama's favorite banker. and later health care, a major issue for americans in the presidential candidates, the coo of mt. sinai, ken david, is going to join us. a crash management system and the world's only tridion safety cell which can withstand over three and a half tons. small in size. big on safety. which can withstand over three and a half tons. if we want t
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> market is down 30 points. we were talking to david kotok at beginning of show how many investors got out of the market. what is mistake it is because stocks are up 9%. >> people looking at true fundamentals true health of the global economy can't really deny that, tracy. melissa: that is the juice market is running. tracy: you guys talked a lot about it. a lot of hedge funds closed up shop on september 30th, called it a day and wrapped it up with a nice little bow. we'll see what happens with the fiscal cliff. >> what did you do with ashley? tracy: he is home with his mama. i'm tracy byrnes, ashley will be back on wednesday. american companies beware. the house intelligence committee says doing business with two chinese telecom firms actually threatens our national security. >>> gas prices soaring once again in california. the state points the finger at refinery supply problems but we'll tell you why california's own regulations are really to blame. >>> just 29 days to go before t
&d, science-based a physical science-based breakthrough. most of it has come from commercialization of the internet which is not as scientific and research based as we typically think of as occurring in universities house of representatives my undergraduate degree is in electrical engineering and look what i'm doing. i take your point. i vaguely remember the three laws of dynamics. so yeah, i take your point but my point is less would've the undergraduate, i don't know we can argue but how important that is, but more, i take your point about the commercialization and the browsers and all that was definitely private, occasional borrowing for more basic research, but my point was that seems like a really critical element was sort of just was the critical mass of people out there, and the guys who founded google were guys who were getting their ph.d's at stanford, you know, and they developed an algorithm out of their training. and just the fact that she did have people working on systems engineering, and it's less the undergraduate but more the government finance, dod research, networ
it in the last few days. the conventional wisdom among the political science crowd is you don't have much variance between where the national horse race stands and where the race stands in the battleground states. if it moves nationally, it moves the same direction in the swing states. we see in this race closer polls nationally where obama will only be ahead by two points or whatever it is, and then you look at ohio and virginia and you see four or five, six, seven point margins. is there any imbalance between the two, and do you have any explanation for it? >> we don't have very many state polls back yet. the initial wave of state polls showed romney doing pretty well in the battleground states. in the rasmussen polls over the last two days, obama is doing better. that's consistent with the trend i talked about earlier. the question is whether obama gets an outsized bounce in states like ohio, nevada and iowa where he was doing better than nationally. if you look at all of the national polls conducted since the first debate, what you see is about a three point gain for romney. if that h
fracking operation. >> the science has been faulty a vendetta against red white and blue. >> how they advanced power and what they want to do with it after the break. [ male announcer favorite foods fight you, fight back fast with tums smoothies. so fast and smooth, you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tutums [ male announcer ] tums smoothies. ♪ tum tum tum tutums why let constipation stry miralax.? mirlax worksdifferently than other laxatives. it dws water into your colon to unblock your system naturally. don't wait to fe great. miralax. >> at the heart of the debate of environmental policy is the environmental protection agency. america is a lot cleaner than it used to be. many give the epa the credit. that isn't all the agency is doing or hopes to do in the future. should americans worry about epa increase? >> want to talk about environmental problems in america? look back a few decades. la smog was so bad in the 1940s one day panicked californians thought the japanese launched a chemical weapons attack. in the 1950s you could barely see across pittsburgh many da
our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose i
fracking operation. >> the science has been faulty a vendetta against red white and bl the >> at the heart of the debate of environmental policy is the environmental protection agency. america is a lot cleaner than it used to be. many give the epa the credit. that isn't all the agency is doing or hopes to do in the future. should americans worry about epa increase? >> want to talk about environmental problems in america? look back a few decades. la smog was so bad in the 1940s one day panicked californians thought the japanese launched a chemical weapons attack. in the 1950s you could barely see across pittsburgh many days in 1965 time magazine pronounced lake erie a dead sea kill bide industrial pollution. president johnson declared the raw sewage flowing down the potomac a national disgrace. for the first time polls showed the environment was one of america's greatest worries. that presented an opportunity to lbj's successor. >> president nixon in 1968 he was moved that to say to his people get out in front of the environment. >> days after nixon took office a huge oil spill hit santa ba
produce. in these fields lies a conflict over the science this fifth generation former uses. >> by buying these seeds we use much less herbicides and sometimes not at all. >> reporter: the seeds are genetically modified to resist insects and require less water. >> the only way we can survive in california is we have to be on the cutting edge of the latest technology. >> reporter: at the strauss family farm, organic dairy farmer albert strauss is pushing back against genetically modified technology. >> i have my own concerns about what affects it has on land, what affects it has on animals. >> reporter: he worries that bio engineering crops can contamination organic crops like his cow's feeds. these two california farmers represent the two sides of this war. people have if right to know if their foods is made from gmo. >> we're saying put it on the label and let people make choices for themselves about what they buy and eat. >> reporter: but opponents say requiring labels on genetically modified foods will make people think they are not healthy. >> by putting a scary sounding label on food
math and science teacher and create more spots in the community colleges so people can get trained and i want to make sure and keep tuitition low for our young people. >> and i want to make sure everybody's christmas stocking is fill would with everything they wanted. one little problem about what he's saying not been race to the top it is not a bad program and i commend arnie duncan for rewarding poem who do well. that is different than it is economy where we punish people for doing well. i wish the president's economic policies are based on that premise and clearly they are not he said we need a 100,000 new teacher classroom is it the responsibility of the federal government to hire teacher a local school board? your schools are your responsibility in your community and state. there is nothing in the federal constitution that said the federal government ought to hire teachers for you. if you think you need more teachers hire them in your local level and let your school board decide who they are and what they teach. it was not just what the cand date said that made the difference
romney walked over him. >> it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself but, look, i think part of that was because, as i've said earlier, we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's 4.8 trillion or $5 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher program. i love teachers. we need more of them. don't believe me. speaker gingrich was pretty elegant in the primaries saying, look, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> and here's ""the new yorker's" take on the debate. it shows mitt romney debating an empty chair. >>> president obama continues be on his fundraising swing through california looking to capitalize on friday's good economic news. september unemployment rate released on friday dipped to 7.8%, the lowest of his presidency. and new fundraising numbers show the obama campaign is coming off its best month of the year raising $1
sciences and behavior and another in administration of justice. currently at san francisco state working on my bachelor's degree in justice studies and also with a minor in urban planning. the reason why i would like to be a part of the balboa park station citizen's advisory committee is because i would like to represent the voice of the community, more specifically in the development that is occurring in the area. i would also like to assist in figuring out how to keep the community voice involved and accountability with the city agencies involved and impact to make deadlines and [speaker not understood] commitments. and then, so, also john avalos is a huge advocate for our community, but it's important to have the community involved. >> thank you, ms. garcia. >>> thank you very much. >> and next we will hear mr. walker. if you would like to speak today. and are there any other applicants that were not listed? okay. oh, i'm sawyer, i thought you were not here today. >>> i'm not alex. i'm henry [speaker not understood]. >> great. so, henry, we'll hear you right after william. >>> good af
to also teach our students, the workforce, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an opt
for his work. and this could change the course of science, seems less likely to change this researcher. >> and i'm a basic scientist. >> i will predict when he wins a nobel prize it will not change him one iota. >> and the mad dash to grab a good deal on black friday may be a waste of time. there are shopper that's do not get lowest prices on friday after thanksgiving. prices for many gifts are qlor at other times. and retailers select just a few items to dur us n walmart teeming fourp a card that is called blue bird and saying it will allow users to avoid increases fees and ause -- allows users to send money through a smart phone app. and there are google could be getting into the credit card business. >> which companies might be spying on us. >>? there is a house intelligence committee calling two tech companies a national security threat n a report throat that wallway and zp have links to china's government and goes on to say they can be using technology to spy on the united states and recommends the u.s. government block mergers involving those companies and warns contractors and b
's no science behind it. if you play baseball, you've got experience. it's just about controlling your heartbeat and we did that today. >> as if there wasn't enough excitement in the world of sports, we're going head out to camden yards and fill you in on the american league division series between the orioles and the yankees. that's still ahead in game on overtime. >> among the 47,000 fans packing busch stadium in st. louis were a group of vocal nats fans. dave owens is in st. louis tonight with that story. >> hey, here i am at busch stadium, looking around for a nats fan, and i think i found that gay, one guy. meet steven clark of northwest d.c. boy is he a long way from home. 47,000 fans, and i just happened to find the one brave enough to rock the occurly w. >> and they proud of that. >>'s big man. >> i have family here. >> but he's a big man on an island. >> it's lonely here. >> tough territory. enduring cardinals cheers. and fans jeers. >> how are you going get outta here alive. >> i don't know. i'm gonna follow you. >> is it looked bleak, but finally after three hours -- >> look at the ga
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